Tuesday, January 24, 2012

2011 Reading Challenge Wrap-up


Here it is at long last. This is a pie that could have been divided in any number of ways, so I chose those that were most interesting to me. I note that my reading was divided exactly equally between fiction and non-fiction, and that without my paying much attention to making it come out even! How 'bout that?

Here are the books I read in 2011 divided in various ways and in no particular order. (Can we pretend that the book titles are properly italicized? When I copied and pasted the lists from a Word document, the italicizing didn't come along.)


Non-Fiction

Q's Legacy by Helene Hanff

At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression by Mildred Armstrong Kalish

84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff

The Pace of a Hen: Ways to Fulfillment for a Housewife by Josephine Moffett Benton

In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan

The Blessings of Weekly Communion by Kenneth Wieting

Keeping House: The Litany of Everyday Life by Margaret Kim Peterson

On Christian Liberty by Martin Luther

Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Conjugal America: On the Public Purposes of Marriage by Allan Carlson

How to Live on 24 Hours a Day by Arnold Bennett

Notes from the Tilt-A-Whirl: Wide-Eyed Wonder in God's Spoken World by N.D. Wilson

1066: The Year of the Conquest by David Howarth

The Natural Family: A Manifesto by Allan C. Carlson and Paul T. Mero

The Most Reluctant Convert: C.S. Lewis's Journey to Faith by David C. Downing

Christmas Book 13 published by Gooseberry Patch

Think: The Life of the Mind and the Love of God by John Piper

Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley

The Madman and the Professor: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester

The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi

The Gentle Art of Domesticity: Stitching, Baking, Nature, Art & the Comforts of Home by Jane Brocket

Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families and Churches by Russell D. Moore

Confessions by St. Augustine

Martin Luther's Christmas Book edited by Roland Bainton


Fiction

Oedipus the King by Sophocles

A Season of Gifts by Richard Peck

Three Men in a Boat: To Say Nothing of the Dog by Jerome K. Jerome

The Code of the Woosters by P.G. Wodehouse

The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Hannah Coulter by Wendell Berry

Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne

A World Lost by Wendell Berry

The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy by Jane Birdsall

Journey Cake by Isabel McLennan McKeekin

How Right You Are, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis

The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan

Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Murder Is Announced by Agatha Christie

The Tuesday Club Murders by Agatha Christie

Good-bye, Mr. Chips by James Hilton

Agamemnon by Aeschylus

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

King Lear by William Shakespeare


Books of a Devotional/Theological Nature

The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis

The Blessings of Weekly Communion by Kenneth Wieting

Keeping House: The Litany of Everyday Life by Margaret Kim Peterson

On Christian Liberty by Martin Luther

Notes from the Tilt-A-Whirl: Wide-eyed Wonder in God's Spoken World by N.D. Wilson

The Most Reluctant Convert: C.S. Lewis's Journey to Faith by David C. Downing

Think: The Life of the Mind and the Love of God by John Piper

Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families and Churches by Russell D. Moore

Confessions by St. Augustine

Martin Luther's Christmas Book edited by Roland Bainton


Children's Books

A Season of Gifts by Richard Peck

Winnie-the-Pooh by A.A. Milne

The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett

The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy by Jane Birdsall

Journey Cake by Isabel McLennan McKeekin

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder


Housekeeping Books

At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

The Pace of a Hen: Ways to Fulfillment for a Housewife by Josephine Moffett Benton

In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan

Keeping House: The Litany of Everyday Life by Margaret Kim Peterson

Christmas 13 published by Gooseberry Patch

Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley

The Gentle Art of Domesticity: Stitching, Baking, Nature, Art & the Comforts of Home by Jane Brocket


Old Books a la C.S. Lewis (100 Years Old or Older)

On Christian Liberty by Martin Luther

How to Live on 24 Hours a Day by Arnold Bennett

Confessions by St. Augustine

Martin Luther's Christmas Book edited by Roland Bainton

Oedipus the King by Sophocles

Three Men in a Boat: To Say Nothing of the Dog by Jerome K. Jerome

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope

Agamemnon by Aeschylus

King Lear by William Shakespeare


Classic Fiction

King Lear by William Shakespeare

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Agamemnon by Aeschylus

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Oedipus the King by Sophocles

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope


Most Disappointing Books

The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy by Jane Birdsall

The Gentle Art of Domesticity by Jane Brocket

The Pace of a Hen: Ways to Fulfillment for a Housewife by Josephine Moffett Benton


Most Pleasantly Surprising Books

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Sixpence in Her Shoe by Phyllis McGinley

At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn

The King's Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi

Journey Cake by Isabelle McLennan McKeekin

Hannah Coulter by Wendell Berry


Funniest Books

The Code of the Woosters by P.G. Wodehouse

How Right You Are, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame


Overall, I'm very pleased with this experiment. I wish I had read more old books, though several were almost a hundred years old. One thing I caught myself doing was avoiding long books (over about 200 pages) because I knew I couldn't finish them in a week. So this year I hope to go back and pick some of those up, which will mean fewer books read this year, of course, but possibly as many or more pages. I discovered that I don't have a natural affinity for ancient literature, which is too bad because I think it's important to read. Hopefully I can make myself tackle a few each year. Thank you for following my reading journey this past year. I will continue to post book reviews from time to time. Happy reading, everyone!

2 comments:

  1. I for one enjoyed all your thoughtful reviews, Martha. I'm with you on the ancient literature and, you're right, it is important and once I do read it (by educating my kids I've placed myself in a position where I've had to read it) I am changed by it, the themes and ideas of these works coming back to me again and again, often when I read a modern work. This week I was reading that one of the delights of Jefferson Davis' life was reading Vergil. I'm definitely not there yet, but maybe someday.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've been off the hook reading ancient literature with my kids since that's Dave's specialty. He always handled that and so I wasn't forced to read it. But I really sense a big hole in my understanding of literature and Western civilization in general because of my lack in this area. So I will slowly plug away at it. The good thing is, Dave is always willing to go along for the ride with me, and that helps me be motivated. His enthusiasm is infectious. And Hannah takes after her father in this. She gobbles up any ancient lit. she can find. She told me the other day she enjoys it as much as reading modern fantasy lit. (and that's really saying something for her!).

    ReplyDelete

Scenes from My House

It's hard to know what to say when you've taken an unintentional two-month-plus blog break.  How do you jump back in?  Do you apolo...

Popular Posts